Tantra Magazine

PART 4
MAYA – THE VEIL THAT TURNS UNITY INTO DIVERSITY
We must mention that while the acting field of the absolute freedom (svatantrya) of the Divine represents the endless, omnipresent consciousness, the power of illusion or maya represents the world of the ephemeral existence and of transmigration.

The difference between these two perspectives (svatantrya and maya) is found in the degree of spiritual vision that we have about the essential nature of the Supreme Reality (God Father).

The manifested object appears as being projected outside the eternal subject even if it always remains within it (the pure and supreme conscious subject) because of the terrible power (or energy) of concealment.

That is why the sage of the non-dual Shivaism from Kashmir asserted that the appearance of diversity is best defined as the projection of the nature of a certain thing, phenomenon, etc. in the Self, a projection which is also done by the Self

The conclusion is that we can talk about a movement of the consciousness which is the pure essence of perception as apparently there are two conditions of the Absolute Divine consciousness (the un-manifested, transcendent one and the exterior, objective, manifested one).

Consequently, the entire Creation is the necessity, or even better, the will of a divine, universal perceiving act because perception represents the intimate connection between the exterior, manifested form of an object and its essential nature that actually defines it.

Thus, the movement of the consciousness from inside to outside is similar to the movement of the consciousness from the unitary condition of the inner and inherent nature of all things to the diversity of their exterior forms.

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This kind of activity of the Divine consciousness is the one associated to the infinite vibration and the only one that can hereby justify the appearance and manifestation of the endless diversity of forms and names in Creation.

It is not a mistake to assert that the Divine Absolute is somehow in a continuous transforming state or, in other words, it is a continuous, infinite and pure creative vibration (spanda).

But, from another point of view we can say that, in fact, there isnt any movement or, even more, any transformation within the Divine Absolute (which is the Supreme Reality or God the Father).

In other words, the movement and the complete absorption are perfectly overlapped at the level of the Supreme Reality.

This paradox (and, in fact all the paradoxes that we face at the supreme level) can only be explained through the absolute freedom (svatantrya) of God the Fathers (Shiva s) consciousness that can accomplish even rationally impossible things like this one (the condition of the Absolute to be perfectly still and, at the same, intensely active).

We know that movement is the displacement between two different points, which determines the existence of at least two different entities between which the movement takes place.

Anyway, as all things are in fact the same supreme consciousness there arent really two different realities between which a movement would take place, at least not in the conventional way that we know.

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Abhinavagupta explains this through the fact that spanda (the creative pulsation of the Divine consciousness) is defined as subtle movement.

He says that if this movement would imply a certain displacement towards another entity, it would not be subtle anymore.

The cosmic process consists in a cyclic series of creations and destructions that succeed one another. Although change appears as a consequence of the manifestation of this cyclic process and although change is somehow the base of the time itself, the pulsation of the Absolute Consciousness is beyond time.

The Supreme Divine Master (Shiva) is eternally and simultaneously implied in all the phases of the creative act but He accomplishes all these phases in a successive manner. Both acting ways are the manifestation of Gods infinite power which is His divinely creative pulsation or spanda.


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