Tantra Magazine

CARISSA
SCIENTIFIC NAMES: Carissa edulis, Carissa grandiflora, fam. Apocynaceae.

DESCRIPTION: A South African shrub used as a hedge or free standing shrub because of its interestingly formed branches and shiny deep-green leaves, offset by white and pink flowers.

The plant bears a 2″ egg-shaped red fruit that exudes a white astringent latex unless fully ripe. The fruit can be eaten out-of-hand but does make good cranberry-like preserves. It is a salt tolerant plant.

The round, oval or oblong fruit, to 2 1/2 in (6.25 cm) long and up to 1 1/2 in (4 cm) across, is green and rich in latex when unripe. As it ripens, the tender, smooth skin turns to a bright magenta-red coated with a thin, whitish bloom, and finally dark-crimson.

The flesh is tender, very juicy, strawberry-colored and -flavored, with flecks of milky sap. Massed in the center are 6 to 16 small, thin, flat, brown seeds, not objectionable when eaten.

USED PARTS: root and flowers.

RECIPES:
For the aphrodisiac effect: Take sublingually powder made of the dried used parts of the herb, in quantities of 1g, every six hours, four times a day, for five months.

Keep the powder under your tongue for 15-20 minutes, then swallow it with some water, and maybe honey. For its aphrodisiac effects, take 3-4 grams at one time, four hours before lovemaking.

Tantra Magazine

CARDOON
SCIENTIFIC NAME: Cynara Cardunculus

DESCRIPTION: Cardoon or artichoke thistle is a robust, thistlelike perennial growing 3-6′ tall, with spiny pinnatifid or bipinnatifid alternate leaves the undersides of which are covered with a white wool and solitary globose purple-flowered heads.

It is occasionally naturalized in low and disturbed places and is native to the Mediterranean region. It is a noxious weed and may be found anywhere in the California Floristic Province, blooming from May to July.

USED PARTS: flowers, leaves, root, stem and flower buds.

EDIBLE USES:
Flower buds – raw or cooked. The buds are harvested just before the flowers open, they are then usually boiled before being eaten. Only the base of each bract is eaten, plus the ‘heart’ or base that the petals grow from.

Stems – cooked and used as a celery substitute. It is best to earth up the stems as they grow in order to blanch them and reduce their bitterness, these blanched stems can then be eaten cooked or in salads.

Young leaves – raw or cooked.

MEDICINAL USES: Anticholesterolemic, cholagogue, digestive, diuretic. A tea made from the leaves and stems is anticholesterolemic, cholagogue, digestive, diuretic. It has a rather bitter flavour but is a very good liver tonic.

Tantra Magazine
RECIPES:
For the aphrodisiac effect: Take sublingually powder made of the dried used parts of the herb, in quantities of 1 g, every six hours, four times a day, for five months.

Keep the powder under your tongue for 15-20 minutes, then swallow it with some water, and maybe honey. For its aphrodisiac effects, take 3-4 grams at one time, four hours before lovemaking.